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AWARDS: $2,350,000 award to automobile accident wrongful death plaintiffs • jury acquittal – double criminal homicide • $1,000,000 award to motorcycle accident wrongful death plaintiffs • jury acquittal – criminal homicide • $465,000 award to medical malpractice plaintiff • jury acquittal – criminal homicide, recklessly endangering another person, neglect of a care dependent person • $325,000 federal jury verdict, UIM and insurance bad faith award to automobile accident plaintiffs • jury acquittal – attempted criminal homicide • $300,000 award to medical malpractice plaintiff • jury acquittal- attempted criminal homicide, aggravated assault with a deadly weapon • $300,000 award to automobile accident/ products liability plaintiffs • jury acquittal – homicide by vehicle while DUI, homicide by vehicle, aggravated assault by vehicle DUI, aggravate assault by vehicle • $115,000 award to truck accident plaintiff • jury acquittal – murder, rape • $100,000 non-jury trial verdict to facial laceration plaintiff • jury acquittal – 1st degree Murder (capital case) • $90,000 award to premises liability/slip-and-fall plaintiff • jury acquittal – DUI, terroristic threats, carrying firearms without a license • $440,000 award to civil rights violation plaintiff • jury acquittal – theft, receiving stolen property • $135,000 award to civil rights violation plaintiff • jury acquittal – possession with intent to deliver a controlled substance (PWI) • $636,000 jury verdict in plaintiffs’ medical malpractice case • jury acquittal – indecent assault, indecent exposure • $550,000 award in plaintiffs’ personal injury case • juvenile case acquittal- solicitation to commit aggravated assault, aggravated assault of unborn child • $250,000 award to mass transit accident plaintiff • jury acquittal – theft, receiving stolen property, conspiracy • $130,000 award to premises liability/slip-and-fall plaintiffs • court-appointed appellate counsel – Supreme Court of Pennsylvania reversal of rape conviction • $465,000 award to automobile accident plaintiff • jury acquittal – aggravated assault • $125,000 award to automobile accident plaintiff • jury acquittal – DUI • non-jury acquittal – dismissal of armed robbery charges • $170,000 award to automobile accident plaintiffs • successful jury verdict in defense of attorney charged with legal malpractice in professional liability case • $140,000 award to injured bicyclist plaintiff • non-jury acquittal – dismissal of 2 counts of criminal homicide • $180,000 award to employment discrimination plaintiff • jury acquittal – indecent exposure • non-jury custody trial – award of primary physical and legal custody of minor to paternal grandparents over natural mother • juvenile decertification petition granted to criminal homicide charges – release at age 21 • non-jury custody trial – award of primary physical and legal custody of minor to father • jury acquittal – DUI • $90,000 award to automobile accident plaintiffs • non-jury custody trial – award of primary physical and legal custody of minor to mother • $50,000 jury verdict for plaintiff- passenger in automobile accident case • non-jury custody trial – award of primary physical and legal custody of minor to father • hung jury – Arson trial (no criminal punishment imposed) • $265,000 award to premises liability plaintiff • jury acquittal – delivery of a controlled substance • $125,000 award to premises liability plaintiff • jury acquittal – DUI • $190,000 award to products liability plaintiff • $150,000 award to premises liability/construction accident plaintiff • $750,000 award to prison medical malpractice and civil rights violation plaintiff • $90,000 award to automobile accident plaintiffs • $108,500 award to automobile accident plaintiff • $80,000 award to automobile accident plaintiff • $150,000 award to truck accident plaintiffs.

The Importance of Noncompetition Clauses in Employment Contracts

Noncompetition or noncompete clauses are common additions to most Pennsylvania employment contracts. They restrict the ability of workers from using the training or proprietary information acquired at their jobs to unfairly compete against their former employers. The U.S. Treasury reports that approximately 30 million American workers, representing 18 percent of the total workforce, are covered by noncompetition clauses.

How noncompete clauses work

Noncompetition clauses protect a company’s trade secrets, customer lists, and other proprietary information by imposing reasonable restrictions in terms of time and distance on an employee’s ability to use the information when his or her employment ends. For example, a clause might prevent a worker from leaving and going to work for a competitor located within a three-mile radius for three years after his or her employment ends.

Requirements for enforceable noncompetition clauses

Because of the restrictions they impose on the ability of people to work, noncompetition clauses are carefully scrutinized by courts asked to enforce them. As a general rule, the clauses must meet the following conditions to be enforceable:

  • Consideration: Workers must receive something of value in exchange for agreeing to a noncompete clause. The offer of a job is usually sufficient consideration.
  • Reasonableness: The restriction on a former worker’s ability to engage in his or her profession must be reasonable under the circumstances associated with each individual situation.
  • Necessity: Restrictions on a worker must be necessary to protect a legitimate business interest of the employer. In other words, it must be necessary to justify limiting where and when someone can be employed.

Getting assistance drafting an enforceable agreement

It is essential to obtain sound legal advice and guidance from attorneys with experience drafting employment contracts. The attorneys at Charles Law Offices in Allentown know the law and keep up to date on court decisions affecting noncompetition clauses.